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SMC|Academic Programs|Physical Sciences|Chemistry Course Information

Chemistry Course Information

 

Chemistry 9: Everyday Chemistry

Students enrolling in this course should have math skills equivalent to those entering Math 31.  This course does NOT fulfill the prerequisite for Chemistry 11.

This course serves to fulfill the general education requirements for a laboratory science course.  Students who successfully complete this course will understand basic chemical principles as they relate to the world around them.  They will also learn various lab techniques, including the safe and competent handling of chemicals and laboratory equipment.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 9:

  1. When given a current event scenario about global warming, students will be able to analyze and discuss the data and potential solutions, using acid/base calculations and appropriate chemical formulas.
  2. Students will be able to write an analysis about some of the current drugs and poisons readily available in today’s marketplace.

Chemistry 9 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 10: Introductory General Chemistry

Prerequisite: Math 31 with minimum grade of C.

This course is an introductory laboratory course that fulfills the prerequisite for Chemistry 11. It introduces principles, laws, and nomenclature of inorganic chemistry and organic chemistry. U. C. gives no credit for Chem. 10 if taken after Chem. 11. 

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 10:

  1. The student will demonstrate the ability to solve chemical problems using logical procedures based on well-established scientific principles.
  2. The student will be able to use chemical theories to explain and predict observable phenomena, using the principles developed in Chemistry 10.
  3. When conducting an experiment, the student will follow written procedures accurately and safely, demonstrate competence with lab equipment and measuring devices, and record data clearly and precisely.

Chemistry 10 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 11: General Chemistry I

Prerequisite: Chemistry 10 with a grade of C or better and Math 20 (intermediate algebra) with a grade of C or better. The student may challenge the Chem 10 prerequisite by taking the Chem 10 Challenge exam. It is recommended that Math 2 (pre-calculus) be taken concurrently.

This course is the first semester of a standard two-semester freshman college chemistry course (Chem 11 and Chem 12). It introduces the fields of physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. Topics to be discussed include atomic structure, chemical bonding, common types of reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and the properties of gases, liquids, and solids.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 11:

  1. The student will demonstrate the ability to solve scientific problems by following logical procedures based on well-established scientific principles. 
  2. The student will follow written procedures used in the general chemistry laboratory accurately and safely. When completing a lab report, the student will correctly apply the scientific method by making reasonable estimates of experimental uncertainties and drawing appropriate conclusions based on the gathered data and scientific principles.
  3. The student will be able to relate microscopic theories to macroscopic observations specifically using the chemical principles developed in Chemistry 11 to explain observable phenomena.  

Chemistry 11 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 12: General Chemistry II

Prerequisite: Chemistry 11 with a grade of C or better and Math 2 (pre-calculus) with a grade of C or better.

This course is a continuation of Chem 11. Topics covered include kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, precipitation reactions, coordination chemistry, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 12:

  1. The student will demonstrate the ability to solve scientific problems by following logical procedures based on well-established scientific principles. 
  2. The student will follow written procedures used in the general chemistry laboratory accurately and safely. When completing a lab report, the student will correctly apply the scientific method by making reasonable estimates of experimental uncertainties and drawing appropriate conclusions based on the gathered data and scientific principles.
  3. The student will be able to relate microscopic theories to macroscopic observations specifically using the chemical principles developed in Chemistry 12 to explain observable phenomena.

Chemistry 12 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 21: Organic Chemistry I

Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a grade of C or better.

This course is a systematic introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds. It encompasses theory and reactions of hydrocarbons and functional group derivatives. Included are bonding and structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, synthesis, mechanism and spectroscopic analysis. The laboratory work focuses on techniques of synthesis, isolation, purification and analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 21:

  1. The student will follow a logical process based on well-established scientific principles and demonstrate the ability to use the appropriate problem-solving techniques to solve a scientific problem such as an organic synthesis comprised of two or more steps, or a determination of the structure of a compound based on spectroscopy (IR, NMR, MS) and/or chemical evidence.
  2. When conducting a laboratory experiment, the student will follow written procedures commonly used in the organic lab (such as reflux, distillation, extraction, recrystallization, and melting-point determination) accurately and safely. When completing a lab report, the student will apply the scientific method correctly by being able to state a hypothesis, take careful measurements, estimate uncertainties and draw appropriate conclusions based on gathered data and scientific principles. 
  3. The student will explain observable phenomena using appropriate scientific theories, such as writing a reaction mechanism consistent with observed facts or utilizing appropriate structures to represent different types of organic molecules and species.

Chemistry 21 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 22: Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 with a grade of C or better.

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 21, with an emphasis on the remaining functional groups and types of reactions. Also included is an introduction to the organic chemistry of biochemical compounds. Chemistry 22 includes lecture and discussion. The second semester of organic chemistry laboratory is a separate course—Chemistry 24. Chemistry 21 and 22 constitute two semesters of organic chemistry with one semester of organic chemistry laboratory. Chemistry 21, 22 and 24 constitute two semesters of organic chemistry with two semesters of laboratory.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 22:

  1. The student will follow a logical process based on well-established scientific principles and demonstrate the ability to use the appropriate problem-solving techniques to solve a scientific problem such as an organic synthesis comprised of three or more steps, or a determination of the structure of an organic molecule or biomolecule based on chemical evidence.
  2. The student will explain observable phenomena using appropriate scientific theories, such as writing a reaction mechanism consistent with observed facts or determination of a compound as aromatic, nonaromatic or antiaromatic by evaluating its structure and/or bonding and utilizing its classification to predict its chemical reactivity.

Chemistry 22 Course Outline of Record

Chemistry 24: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Corequisite: Chemistry 22.  Students must have completed Chemistry 22 with a C or better or be concurrently enrolled in Chemistry 22 at SMC in order to enroll in Chemistry 24.

This course is the second semester of organic chemistry laboratory. The laboratory work involves synthesis, structure determination, reaction mechanisms, and qualitative analysis. The lectures will discuss the theory and techniques that relate to the experiments that are performed, including NMR, IR, organic qualitative analysis, and various forms of chromatography.

Maximum UC credit for Chemistry 22 and Chemistry 24 combined is 5 units. 

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 24:

  1. The student will follow a logical process based on well-established scientific principles and demonstrate the ability to use the appropriate problem-solving techniques to solve a scientific problem such as the determination of the structure of a compound based on spectroscopy (IR, NMR, MS) and/or chemical evidence, or the prediction of a compound’s chemical and/or physical behavior based on the behaviors of similar compounds.
  2. When conducting a laboratory experiment, the student will follow written procedures commonly used in the organic lab (such as thin-layer chromatography, recrystallization and reflux) accurately and safely. The student will maintain an accurate and organized lab notebook. When completing a lab report the student will apply the scientific method correctly by being able to state a hypothesis, take careful measurements, estimate uncertainties and draw appropriate conclusions based on gathered data and scientific principles. 
  3. The student will explain observable phenomena using appropriate scientific theories, such as explaining the likely meaning of a lower-than-expected melting point, correlating the color and visible spectrum of a molecule, or other observations made during lab experiments.

Chemistry 24 Course Outline of Record


Chemistry 31: Biochemistry I

Prerequisite: Chemistry 22 with a grade of C or better.

This course is a survey of biochemistry that introduces the student to the structure and function of important biochemical compounds as well as to the central reactions of metabolism. The main topics include the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, the catalysis, kinetics and regulation of enzymes, the reactions of glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. The laboratory section of the course provides an introduction to common biochemistry lab procedures including amino acid titration, peptide analysis, column chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis, and the kinetic analysis of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

Student Learning Outcomes for Chemistry 31:

  1. The student will follow a logical process based on well-established scientific principles and demonstrate the ability to use the appropriate problem-solving techniques to solve a scientific problem such has determining the structure and/or function of a protein or explain how the energy of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle is harnessed to fuel biosynthesis.
  2. When conducting a laboratory experiment, the student will follow written procedures commonly used in biochemistry including spectrophotometry, measuring and expressing enzyme activity, and various types of chromatography. When completing a lab report, the student will apply the scientific method correctly by being able to state a hypothesis, take careful measurements, estimate uncertainties and draw appropriate conclusions based on gathered data and scientific principles.
  3. The student will explain observable phenomena using appropriate scientific theories, such as explaining the consequences of genetic variations in hemoglobin or writing a reaction mechanism for an enzyme catalyzed reaction.

Chemistry 31 Course Outline of Record